US-agents-fantasy

US literary agents for fantasy fiction

US-agent-fantasy

US literary agents representing fantasy



The fantasy fiction market has been incredibly successful over the years, and publishers have made a lot of money from it.


There are plenty fantasy-loving agents but finalising your agent shortlist can be a painstakingly long, dull task. Unless you’re using AgentMatch, that is.    

We’ve done all the hard work for you: scoured the four corners of the web for every interview, interesting fact, and noteworthy quote, it’s all there. So, why not take out our 7-day free trial to get complete access to all the US literary agent profiles.  

After selecting your country (we advise that US based authors query US based agents), genre or non-fiction subject, you’ll receive a personalised list of suitable agent profiles. Save your search results and work through them one by one, at your own pace. Here’s some names to get you started: 

Tracey Adams

Amelia Appel

Amy Elizabeth Bishop

Connor Goldsmith

Donald Maass

Kristen Nelson

Tricia Skinner

Need more information? We break everything down in our guide to finding a literary agent – it’s invaluable for all querying authors! 



US-agents-fantasy

There have been some excellent authors who have written in the genre, China Mieville, Neil Gaiman, and Iain Banks to name a few.  This means that there are plenty of agents looking for the next big thing in fantasy to come their way. If that’s you, then AgentMatch should be your next stop! 

To make sure your fantasy novel stands out from the slushpile try reading this article on world-building. You’ll probably also find this piece by published author Geraldine Pinch on how to write a fantasy novel useful, too. 

Best of luck! 

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US literary agents representing politics and current affairs

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US literary agents representing politics and current affairs



‘Non-fiction’ covers a wide range of subjects, and in this case, politics and current affairs offers a broad and eclectic market.


There are plenty of ways to figure out which agents represent your genre but finalising your shortlist can be a painstakingly long, dull task. Unless you’re using AgentMatch, that is.    

We’ve done all the hard work for you: scoured the four corners of the web for every interview, interesting fact, and noteworthy quote, it’s all there. So, why not take out our 7-day free trial to get complete access to all the US literary agent profiles.  

After selecting your country (we advise that US based authors query US based agents), genre or non-fiction subject, you’ll receive a personalised list of suitable agent profiles. Save your search results and work through them one by one, at your own pace. Here’s some names to get you started: 

Betsy Amster  

Amy Elizabeth Bishop 

Dado Derviskadic 

Stuart Krichevsky 

Rita Rosenkranz 

Gordon Warnock 

Howard Yoon  

Need more information? We break everything down in our guide to finding a literary agent – it’s invaluable for all querying authors! 

If your book isn’t strictly about politics but about how society works, think Malcolm Gladwell, or similar to Michael Lewis and addresses specific aspects of how the world works, then agents within this category are likely a good match for you. 

It’s important to remember that no agents only specialise in politics and current affairs. Your agent is likely to represent a range of areas including serious and topical non-fiction, fiction, as well as other lighter non-fiction subjects, too. This doesn’t mean that your agent won’t have the necessary connections. He or she will have them and will be motivated to place your work in the best (and most lucrative) place possible. 

Good luck! 

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US literary agents for YA

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US literary agents for YA



In recent years, young adult (YA) fiction has become a competitive and super selling genre.

There are plenty of agents that represent young adult fiction to choose from, but finalising your agent shortlist can be a painstakingly long, dull task. Unless you’re using AgentMatch, that is.    

We’ve done all the hard work for you: scoured the four corners of the web for every interview, interesting fact, and noteworthy quotes, it’s all there. So, why not take out our 7-day free trial to get complete access to all the US literary agent profiles.  

After selecting your country (we advise that US based authors query US based agents), genre or non-fiction subject, you’ll receive a personalised list of suitable agent profiles. You can save your search results and then work through them one by one, at your own pace. Here’s some agents to get you started: 

Ben Grange 

Leon Husock  

Sarah Landis 

Thao Le  

Kiana Nguyen  

Quressa Robinson 

Cindy Uh 

Need more information? We break everything down in our guide to finding a literary agent – it’s invaluable for all querying authors! 

Books like J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series have made it acceptable and popular for adults to read and enjoy children’s fiction. What followed was a number of spectacular authors, such as Anthony Horowitz, Suzanne Collins, Melinda Salisbury, and many more. 

The fact that the YA fiction market has been so successful means that agents are inevitably interested in the area and keen to take on outstanding work. So you’d better get started!

Best of luck! 

The secret to getting an agent



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US literary agents for Historical Fiction

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US literary agents for Historical Fiction



Looking for an agent that represents historical fiction? Then look no further, we answer all your questions here. Plus, we’ll even introduce a few agents you may like to query!

There are plenty of agents that represent historical fiction to choose from, but finalising your shortlist can be a painstakingly long, dull task. Unless you’re using AgentMatch, that is.    

We’ve done all the hard work for you: scoured the four corners of the web for every interview, interesting fact, and noteworthy quote, it’s all there. So, why not take out our 7-day free trial to get complete access to all the US literary agent profiles.  

After selecting your country (we advise that US based authors query US based agents), genre or non-fiction subject, you’ll receive a personalised list of suitable agent profiles. Save your search results and work through them one by one, at your own pace. Here’s some historical fiction agents to get you started: 

Josh Adams  

Natalia Aponte  

Julie Barer  

Joelle Delbourgo 

Kemi Faderin  

David McCormick 

Kristin Nelson 

Steven Salpeter  

Mitchell Waters  

Need more information? We break everything down in our guide to finding a literary agent – it’s invaluable for all querying authors! 

The market



The historical fiction market is a wonderfully diverse and rich genre to be writing in. It is comprised of award-winning authors like Hilary Mantel, commercial talents such as Kate Mosse and Phillipa Gregory, and the thrilling talents of Conn Iggulden and Robert Harris. Let’s not forget the weird and wonderful crossovers, like Victorian-inspired steampunk fantasies and even historical erotica. 

As you can see, the historical fiction market is brimming with vibrant, intelligent and lively books. But what does that mean for you? Well, in short, it means that locating the right literary agent to represent you and your novel will be pretty trying. After all, Hilary Mantel’s agent may not be the right person to handle that Victorian-inspired steampunk fantasy. Just a mere interest or reference to historical fiction won’t be enough of a connection. 

This is why, once you’ve created a longlist of potential agents it’s important to review each agent’s profile. Find points of contact with each agent. Maybe they represent a favourite author, or list one of your favourite books, or maybe they’re Irish and your book is set in Dublin, etc. These points of contact will help you ascertain which agents you feel would be a good match, and if you mention them in your query letter could make a great first impression with the individual agent. 

Best of luck! 

The secret to getting an agent



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US literary agents for erotica

US-erotica-agents

US literary agents for erotica



Are you looking for a US agent that represents erotica? Then look no further. We have all the information right here, at your fingertips. Oh, and we’ll also introduce a few agents too.

There are plenty of ways to figure out which agents represent your genre but finalising your shortlist can be a painstakingly long, dull task. Unless you’re using AgentMatch, that is.   

We’ve done all the hard work for you: scoured the four corners of the web for every interview, interesting fact, and noteworthy quote, it’s all there. So, why not take out our 7-day free trial to get complete access to all the US literary agent profiles. 

After selecting your country (we advise that US based authors query US based agents), genre or non-fiction subject, you’ll receive a personalised list of suitable agent profiles. Save your search results and work through them one by one, at your own pace. Here’s a few names to get you started: 

Steven Axelrod 

Lucienne Diver 

Danielle Egan-Miller

Ethan Ellenberg 

Sarah Megibow 

Lori Perkins 

Not too long ago finding an agent for erotic fiction was close to impossible. Agents were snobby. They were worried that erotic manuscripts were not saleable and feared that the erotica genre simply wouldn’t pay. 

Then came E.L. James. After her huge success with the Fifty Shades of Grey series, agents and publishers have learnt the value of books in this genre. Even quite highbrow agencies are now open to submissions of erotic fiction. 

So, if you’re thinking about querying agents, then you need to read our guide to finding a literary agent – it’s invaluable for all querying authors! 

Best of luck! 

The secret to getting an agent



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US science fiction literary agents

US-science-fiction-agents

US science-fiction literary agents



The science-fiction market remains as varied as it has always been, with plenty of international (and commercial) appeal.

There are plenty of science-fiction loving agents, but finalising your shortlist can be a painstakingly long, dull task. Unless you’re using AgentMatch, that is.   

We’ve done all the hard work for you: scoured the four corners of the web for every interview, interesting fact, and noteworthy quotes, it’s all there. So, why not take out our 7-day free trial to get complete access to all the US literary agent profiles. 

After selecting your country (we advise that US based authors query US based agents), genre or non-fiction subject, you’ll receive a personalised list of suitable agent profiles. You can save your search results and then work through them one by one, at your own pace. Here’s some science-fiction agents to get you started: 

Tracey Adams  

Julie Barer  

Beth Campbell 

Connor Goldsmith 

Mark Gottlieb  

Evan Gregory  

Monika Verma

Kieryn Ziegler 

Need more information? We break everything down in our guide to finding a literary agent – it’s invaluable for all querying authors! 


US-science-fiction-agents

Are you really writing science fiction?



Although you can still write classic space opera and find an eager market for it, there has been an increased interest in seeing more dystopia, genre collisions, and intelligent idea-driven fiction. 

As a genre, science fiction remains rich. You can even argue that literary novelists like Margaret Atwood and David Mitchell have published science-fiction novels. George Orwell and Aldous Huxley are certainly renowned for their sci-fi masterpieces. While authors like Iain Banks and China Mieville, who aren’t traditionally considered as literary novelists, have produced some excellent examples of challenging, bold, and thoughtful fiction.  

As the science-fiction market is so rich and deeply varied, it’s important to ask yourself: ‘am I really writing science fiction?’ 

For example:  

  • A near-future thriller about an as-yet-undiscovered virus could well market itself more accurately as a techno-thriller and be suitable for crime and thriller agents and editors. 
  • An intelligent novel, like David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas, is probably better sold as literary fiction, no matter whether or not it uses sci-fi ideas and techniques. 

If science-fiction is the right genre for you, then you’ll probably want to read this article on world-building 

And, if you’re still unsure about where your book will sit then try using AgentMatch, our database of all US and UK agents. Using the genre search you can peruse the agent profile pages to see what agents are looking for and find the best possible fit for your novel. 

Wishing you lots of intergalactic luck! 

The secret to getting an agent



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How to find a US literary agent for non-fiction

US -literary-agents-for-nonfiction

How to find a US literary agent for non-fiction



Looking for a US literary agent that specialises in nonfiction? Here’s your guide to finding an agent; learn who they are, what they’re looking for and how to hook them. 

Non-fiction literary agents



There are plenty of ways to figure out which agents represent your genre but finalising your shortlist can be a painstakingly long, dull task. Unless you’re using AgentMatch, that is.  

We’ve done all the hard work for you: scoured the four corners of the web for every interview, interesting fact, and noteworthy quote, it’s all there. So, why not take out our 7-day free trial to get complete access to all the US literary agent profiles.

After selecting your country (we advise that US based authors query US based agents), genre or non-fiction subject, you’ll receive a personalised list of suitable agent profiles. Save your search results and work through them one by one, at your own pace. Here’s some non-fiction agents to get you started:

Rita Rosenkranz  

Katie Zanecchia

Andy Ross 

Sam Stoloff 

Howard Yoon 

Anna Sproul-Latimer 

Scott Hoffman 

Elisabeth Weed

Dawn Hardy 

Matt Bialer 

Michael Bourret 

Need more information? We break everything down in our guide to finding a literary agent – it’s invaluable for all querying authors! 


US-literary-agents-nonfiction

What are non-fiction agents looking for?



Ultimately all literary agents are looking for a saleable manuscript. While non-fiction subjects can be varied, agents are generally interested in: 

  • Celebrity-led projects, anything written or endorsed by a celebrity 
  • Strong and compelling memoirs 
  • Exotic travel stories, whether they’re funny or moving 
  • Popular science 
  • Narrative-led history 
  • Biographies, especially if the subject is well-known 
  • Major new diet or motivational work 
  • Strong and quirky one-off pieces 
  • LGBTQ+ themes. 

The important thing to remember, is that unfortunately, no one is looking for niche. Anything specific with a narrow market, like local history books or biographies of unknown subjects, aren’t traditionally sought after by agents. You may find that your work might be picked up by the right publisher, but it’s unlikely you’ll get an agent for these types of projects. 

You’ll notice that specialist and academic nonfiction isn’t listed here, either. That’s because your best bet would be to write up a book proposal and pitch directly to publishers who specialise in your subject area. You don’t typically need an agent for these.  

Few agents focus solely on non-fiction projects. Most agents will build a fiction and non-fiction list, just as they would cultivate a literary and commercial list. The important thing to remember is that it’s the quality of the agent that really matters, not whether they specialise in a particular genre. 

Having said that, there are some exceptions. As a general rule: 

  • Authors of cookbooks, health and diet, or a how-to book may want an agent who does specialise in these areas. It’s definitely not an easy genre to break into, though. 
  • If you’re looking to work with a ghost-writer to help tell your story, then you’ll want to find an agent that has experience working on similar projects. But beware, very few personal stories warrant the cost of a ghost-writer. If you want to publish your story, then it’s worth writing it yourself – with our help, of course!

Don’t forget you can research agent’s interests by either searching the relevant agency website, or by simply using our database of US and UK based literary agents, AgentMatch, to help narrow down your search. 

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How do you know what literary agents want?



This can be split into three categories: first, know what you need to query agents with. 

For fiction submissions, you need to have written the whole book before querying agents. With non-fiction submissions, you can often get away with sending a book proposal, which is basically an outline of the book you intend to write, first. 

If your book is story-led (think memoirs), then it would be worth writing the whole book before you submit to agents. 

But if your non-fiction is subject based, then its fine to start with the book proposal. 

Secondly, deliver a saleable manuscript. 

As I mentioned above, the only thing agents are really looking for is a manuscript that will sell well and make money. This means you need: 

  • Strong, popular, entertaining writing – even if your subject is interesting, if the writing is poor no ones going to want to read it! 
  • To write for the market. Obvious, yes, but a surprisingly high number of nonfiction authors don’t know who their intended market is. So, if you don’t know yours, then go to a bookstore or local library and find out. 

And finally, get professional help. If you keep getting agent rejections or just want to perfect your manuscript first, then it’s time to ask for help. There’s lots of information out there. We’ve helped non-fiction authors in their writing journeys, and we can help you too. So, get in touch. 

Best of luck with your submissions; and remember, let us know how you get on! 

The secret to getting an agent



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How to get a US agent for your crime thriller

US-literary-agent-thrillers

How to get a US agent for your crime thriller



There’s a common misconception that if you’re a crime or thriller writer you need an agent who focuses solely on those genres. But agents typically have eclectic tastes and like to diversify their list.


If you go to a leading crime agent, you may just become one in a number of crime authors. But, if you find an agent who appeals to you and whose client list is a little light on crime titles, then your book could be just what they’re looking for.

US crime and thriller agents



There are plenty of ways to figure out which agents represent your genre but finalising your shortlist can be a painstakingly long, dull task. Unless you’re using AgentMatch, that is.  

We’ve done all the hard work for you: scoured the four corners of the web for every interview, interesting fact, and noteworthy quote, it’s all there. So, why not take out our 7-day free trial to get complete access to all the US literary agent profiles.

After selecting your country (we advise that US based authors query US based agents), genre or non-fiction subject, you’ll receive a personalised list of suitable agent profiles. Save your search results and work through them one by one, at your own pace. Here’s a few crime/thriller agents to get you started:

Jessica Alvarez

Amelia Appel

Noah Ballard

Rachel Beck 

Danielle Egan-Miller 

Donald Mass 

Evan Marshall 

Kiana Nguyen

Joy Tutela

Need more information? We break everything down in our guide to finding a literary agent – it’s invaluable for all querying authors! 


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How to target submissions



It’s important that you find an agent that is interested in representing crime or thriller novels. A little targeting of potential agents is fine, as long as you don’t overdo it. There are two things that we always advise querying authors to consider, when they’re searching for agents: 

  1. Check who represents your favourite author. Even if your favourite author writes women’s fiction or literary fiction, you may find that you and the agent share a taste for a certain kind of writing and have something in common. 
  2. Research agents that represent good but lesser known authors in your genre. If you were to query Dan Brown’s agent, for instance, that would certainly be a waste of time as his desk would undoubtedly be covered in various conspiracy-thriller-manuscripts. Whereas, if you find a pool of talented thriller authors that haven’t yet hit the big time, those agents are more likely to be open to seeing submissions from querying authors. 

If you’re still convinced that the only way to publication is through a Very Well-Known Agent, then have a think about this: 

  • The Very Well-Known Agent will have a long list of Big-Name clients (sometimes over a hundred!). Do you want to be the least important on that list? 
  • A Very Well-Known Agent may not be looking for debut writers at all. Any additions to their client list will likely be established authors moving agencies. 
  • Selling a book to a publisher, isn’t rocket science. If the agent is competent and can sell a literary novel, for example, then they have all the skills to sell any other genre too. If an agent’s contacts are weak in one area, then after a few phone calls that’s easily rectified. The exception being fantasy or science fiction and children’s fiction; both markets are pretty specialist. 
  • Publishers want to find wonderful, saleable books. They won’t care who the agent is that submits it to them. All that matters is that a) the editor loves the manuscript, and b) enough other people in the company love it, too. Ultimately, all that really matters is your writing. 

You can read up on more tips for crime and thriller writing, here. If you’re writing a police procedural crime novel, then this article on researching those procedures is everything you need to read today! 

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US agents for popular science

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US literary agents for popular science



Looking for an agent that represents popular science non-fiction work? Then look no further, we answer all your questions here. Plus, we’ll even introduce a few agents you should query!


There are plenty of ways to figure out which agents represent your genre but finalising your shortlist can be a painstakingly long, dull task. Unless you’re using AgentMatch, that is.    

We’ve done all the hard work for you: scoured the four corners of the web for every interview, interesting fact, and noteworthy quote, it’s all there. So, why not take out our 7-day free trial to get complete access to all the US literary agent profiles.  

After selecting your country (we advise that US based authors query US based agents), genre or non-fiction subject, you’ll receive a personalised list of suitable agent profiles. Save your search results and work through them one by one, at your own pace. Here’s some names to get you started: 

Jessica Alvarez  

Danielle Egan-Miller

Regina Brooks 

Annie Hwang

Jody Kahn 

Adam Schear

Frank Weimann 

Cindy Uh

Need more information? We break everything down in our guide to finding a literary agent – it’s invaluable for all querying authors! 

The Market



Authors of popular science and psychology are more popular than ever. Stephen Hawking, Oliver Sacks and Michio Kaku, to name a few.  

Regardless of the ebook revolution and its impact on the publishing market, it remains the case that for countless areas of the book trade that traditional publishers still dominate. Your most likely route to those publishers will be via literary agents. 

It’s important to remember that no agents only specialise in popular science. Your agent is likely to represent a range of areas including serious and topical non-fiction, fiction, as well as other lighter non-fiction subjects, too. This doesn’t mean that your agent won’t have the necessary connections. He or she will have them and will be motivated to place your work in the best (and most lucrative) place possible. 

Best of luck! 

The secret to getting an agent



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US agents seeking new authors

US-agents-new-authors

US literary agents seeking debut authors



We receive lots of questions, but two of the most common must be: how do you find a literary agent? Do you know literary agents who are taking on new, first-time writers? 


There are plenty of ways to figure out which agents represent your genre but finalising your shortlist can be a painstakingly long, dull task. Unless you’re using AgentMatch, that is.    

We’ve done all the hard work for you: scoured the four corners of the web for every interview, interesting fact, and noteworthy quote, it’s all there. So, why not take out our 7-day free trial to get complete access to all the US literary agent profiles.  

After selecting your country (we advise that US based authors query US based agents), genre or non-fiction subject, you’ll receive a personalised list of suitable agent profiles. Save your search results and work through them one by one, at your own pace. Here’s some names to get you started: 

Lauren Bieker 

Amelia Appel

Joquelle Caiby 

Sonali Chanchani

Jennifer Kim

Kiana Nguyen 

Quressa Robinson

Need more information? We break everything down in our guide to finding a literary agent – it’s invaluable for all querying authors! 

How do you find an agent?



Nearly all agents take on new authors. If they didn’t, they’d go out of business. It might not happen straightaway, but eventually they will. 

It’s important to remember that all agents need to submit to the same group of editors. They’re a small group at that: most books are pitched to 8-12 publishers in the first round of marketing. So, all agents are looking for quality manuscripts. If they find one, and love it, they’ll take it on. If they don’t, they won’t. 

It’s somewhat easier to secure a new up-and-coming agent than a giant of the industry. That’s not because quality standards are different – because they’re not – but because newer agents are actively seeking submissions and are prepared to work hard to grow their client list. If you went to such an agent, with a manuscript that was dazzling but still imperfect, then they may be prepared to work with you to fix it. However, a more established agent with an already long client list may regretfully turn the book down. 

If you’re looking for an agent who genuinely welcomes first-time authors, rather than just accepting them, it’s a good idea to approach those who don’t necessarily have an established client base. So, you’re looking for agents new to the role, or those who have come into the profession from somewhere else in the industry. 

Don’t just query smaller agencies, there are plenty small agencies that already have an extensive client base. Also, larger agencies tend to have more new recruits hungry to build their list. Try not to rule anyone out until you’ve done your research. 

As always, these guidelines should be balanced against everything else. Ultimately, you’re looking for an agent who genuinely loves your book and believes they can sell it. The fact that the agent may work for a small or large agency, or maybe new to the game or well-established, doesn’t matter. 

You, the book, the agent. If these three things gel, then nothing else matters. 

If you keep getting agent rejections or just want to perfect your manuscript first, then it’s time to ask for help. There’s lots of information out there. We’ve helped hundreds of authors in their writing journeys, and we can help you too. So, get in touch. 

The secret to getting an agent



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